Ferritin and Hypothyroidism

Ferritin and Hypothyroidism

In this post I’ll cover everything you need to know about ferritin and hypothyroidism.  The ferritin test is a simple blood test and it is one of the most important tests you should have if you have Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease, and hypothyroidism. Ferritin is a storage form of iron and the ferritin level test can tell you if your iron stores are low and need to be increased. The ferritin test is rarely ordered by conventional doctors so many patients are left with the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism when it is actually their low ferritin levels that are causing their health problems.  The first issue with iron is that iron deficiency may be quite severe but blood markers such as hemoglobin and the red blood cell count may be normal. This leaves many patients, especially women, misdiagnosed as not having anemia.

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Does the Ketogenic Diet Cause Hypothyroidism?

Does the Ketogenic Diet Cause Hypothyroidism?

The ketogenic diet is currently sweeping the internet and the diet book world as the best thing since sliced bread for everything under the sun. Unfortunately, you can’t eat bread on the ketogenic diet and it really can be difficult to follow for some people.

Since I work with many patients who have Hashimoto’s disease and hypothyroidism, I wanted to investigate whether the ketogenic diet can cause hypothyroidism or decrease thyroid function. Let’s jump into the research and see what it has to say.

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The Thyroid and Thyroid Hormones

The Thyroid and Thyroid Hormones

The thyroid is a small gland that lies in the neck about the level of the Adam’s apple and weighs approximately one ounce.  It produces thyroid hormone and calcitonin.  The parathyroid glands are very small and lie on the outside portion of the thyroid gland and secrete parathyroid hormone.  Thyroid hormone ignites your metabolism so you can burn fat and produce energy.  We will be focusing on thyroid hormone.

The thyroid gland is stimulated to make thyroid hormone by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) which is produced in the pituitary gland located in the brain.  The pituitary is controlled by the hypothalamus in the brain which monitors the amount of circulating thyroid hormone.  Iodine must enter the thyroid gland through a transport system that is repaired with the intake of vitamin C.  There is usually about 20-30 mg of iodine in the body and 75 percent of it is stored in the thyroid.  In addition to iodine, iron, tyrosine, selenium, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin D, magnesium, zinc, copper, and vitamins B2, B3, and B6 are required for thyroid hormone production. Read more